rubbish dump workers

It’s not always easy to put into words what God does in our lives. For those of you who don’t like all the touchy feely talk I’ll try not to emote too much. But please bear with me for one small paragraph as I attempt to share what happened to me in Cambodia. I went to Cambodia because I knew that God wanted us to go there and that somehow, something significant would take place. I wasn’t sure what to expect but I sure didn’t expect to find myself in tears or close to tears as much as i found myself. From the first day of our outreach when we went on a tour and ended up talking to a man in the TB ward in Poi Pet to the day we spent at the rubbish dump in Siem Reap, God never stopped working in me, building a compassion for the nation and its people that was overwhelming at times and even weeks later is still so close to the surface that I feel like I want to cry often.

Cambodia is a people robbed and plundered yet people from all around the world are beginning to cry “Restore!” and that cry is being answered as God is sending people from many nations to go there to minister, release hope and answers to their needs. While we were in Poi Pet there were missions groups from three other organisations there. I have since heard of others that have been there even in this last month so God is definitely doing things there. A group of business men and leaders from 9 different nations came in for three days while we were there to see what business initiatives they could help the locals with. Poi Pet is on God’s radar and in his sights.

PoiPet is a dusty border city that most people transition through as quickly as possible. Rubbish lies everywhere you look on the streets, especially if you

slum village house

leave the main road. There is little town planning infrastructure and slum villages line the roads with little or no power, no sewerage facilities and no town water supply. Water comes from a hand pump if the slum village is lucky enough to have one. Building codes are non-existant I think judging by the heights and widths of the various sets of stairs we climbed in the buildings we entered. Even from floor to floor the height and width of the stairs varied and when you’re short some of those stairs were high.

PoiPet is one of the major trafficking routes through to Thailand and the world where children are trafficked for either the sex trade or as unpaid slave workers. It is this that Extreme Prophetic is fighting and one life at a time beginning to make a difference in. What a privilege to see rescued children smiling and laughing with no fear in their eyes because of the healing that is taking place in their lives. That is not something I will ever forget.

To minister at the rubbish dump and see the conditions people there live in was eye-opening and heartbreaking. To have so little to give them in the natural was hard but to share love – priceless. Many came to the Lord that day and were healed physically. (The team has since gone back there and the healed gave testimony of what God had done in their lives and more got saved). A whole village of people live and work in that dump trying to find something of value in rubbish that has already been picked over many times before it gets to the dump. One lady we talked to was looking for old thrown out rice in order to feed her family.  But mostly they search for anything that will have a resale value from thrown out food to sell to the pig farmers to bottles and rags.

rubbish dump house

One group of young people we talked to turned out to be three orphaned brothers and sisters who lived and worked there because there was nowhere else they could go. Yet even in the midst of the dirt and foul smelling rubbish children played and babies suckled. One lady told us her children and grandchildren all lived together at the dump. What a place to raise a family yet they have little other choice. I saw in that rubbish dump one hand pump for water – and who knows what has leached into that water system from the rubbish.

Yet in the middle of all that we saw and heard hope being planted and lives touched and changed by the love of the team as they ministered. Over the time we were in Cambodia we saw people receive God’s love, be healed, receive hope and help; yet I think we were touched and changed as much as the people we ministered to. We know we’ll be going back and are looking forward to it even now.

Below is a selection of images that while showing something of life in Cambodia, don’t begin to portray the reality really but I hope they give you some idea of our trip.

slum houses with tv


to market, to market

travelling between towns

building practises - bamboo scaffolding and branches to hold the floor up while everything sets.


family transport - the most we saw was six on a bike

children praying to receive Jesus


 

Gregory cutting a village childs hair

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